Téléchargement en cours...

Things to see in Ouvéa

Set off to discover the most stunning sites and the most beautiful outings on Ouvéa, the gem of the Loyalty Islands, registered by Unesco as a World Heritage Site. Don’t forget your camrea.

Fayaoué District
Fayaoué Beach
Fayaoué Beach
On Ouvéa, the leeward coast has a very long beach, an almost uninterrupted and deserted ribbon of immaculate white sand. The Fayaoué Beach alone measures 22 km, and extends from Mouli Bridge to Wadrilla, which makes See more it the biggest beach in New Caledonia. Here you won’t have any trouble choosing where to put your pareo and tracking down down a quiet little corner: whatever day or time it is, there is no-one! Just a bunch of children doing somersaults in the turquoise water, and a lone fisherman using a majestic gesture to cast his corolla-shaped net, which captures sardines, silversides and other small mullet. Hide
The Wadrilla coconut oil distillery and soap factory
The Wadrilla coconut oil distillery and soap factory
With a coconut grove estimated at over 3,000 ha, Ouvéa launched the production of copra oil in 1991. After grinding and pressing, the coconuts are turned into oil (1 tonne of oil produced for 2 tonnes of copra treated), See more a biofuel which partly supplies the generator at the Ouenghé power plant. The plant provides about a third of the island’s power requirements. The rest of the production is used by the Iaaï soap factory, which since 2001 has been making household soap, soap perfumed with niaouli and even soapflakes for laundry detergent. Both the oil distillery and the soap factory can be visited free of charge. Meet up each weekday morning near the Wadrilla wharf. Hide
trou bleu d’Hanawa (Hanawa Blue Hole)
trou bleu d’Hanawa (Hanawa Blue Hole)
The Hanawa Blue Hole is hidden near the Casse-Cou pass, in the narrowest part of the isthmus that marks the boundary between the Fayaoué and Saint Joseph districts. This circular pool, 30 m in diameter and airforce blue See more in colour, is fed by seawater through fissures in the coral. A magical site of tranquil beauty, it is used as a bathing spot by local children and a refuge by sea turtles. One of Commander Cousteau’s teams explored it but never managed to reach the bottom. The Blue Hole is not easy to track down: ask for permission before venturing there. Hide
The Saint-Paul vanilla plantation
The Saint-Paul vanilla plantation
In Saint Paul, Evelyne launched into the vanilla adventure about 10 years ago and her plantation, Vanico, today has nearly 4,000 stems. The visit lasts about an hour. The owner offers for sale vanilla pods and vanilla powder, See more for pastry or sauces. Along with Vanico, about 50 planters from the centre (Wadrilla, Banout, Hnyimaha) and the north of the island (Teouta, Weneki, Takedji and especially Gossanah) have formed an association, Bunen Hnyei Iaaï (perfume of Ouvéa). At a time when a Vanilla Centre is opening on Lifou, the association’s main objective is to best meet the growing demand for green pods. Hide
Mouli District
The Mouli Bridge
The Mouli Bridge
Mouli Bridge (1984) spans the strait separating the main island of Ouvéa from the Mouli isthmus, which has an idyllic beach and is the departure point for the Southern Pleaides islets. This structure with its ultramarine guardrails See more offers an unforgettable view towards the Lékiny Cliffs and the bay of the same name, which has been transformed into a fishing reserve for the inhabitants of little Fayawa Island (swimming banned). Above all, it is a favoured point for observing the aquatic fauna which constantly slip between its pillars: spotted eagle or manta rays, trevally, sharks, turtles, barracudas and so on. And what words can describe the shifting greens and blues painted on the surface of the lagoon by the sun as it plays with the clouds? Hide
The Lékiny Cliffs
The Lékiny Cliffs
Following many geological upheavals, the Ouvéa atoll gradually subsided to the west, giving birth to the islets. On the east coast, the land rose up to form high coral cliffs, sculpted by erosion. To reach the Lékiny Cliffs See more from the campsite, there are two solutions: the glass-bottomed boat at high tide or by foot at low tide. A short wooden ladder is used to get up to the first level of the grey cliff, a shaded balcony which leads to a small cave arranged as a chapel. On one side, the gentle turquoise of the lagoon, on the other the deep blue of the ocean crashing furiously behind the cliff. A stroll balanced between sky and sea... Hide
Ouvéa sculptors
In Lékiny, sculpture is an art handed down from father to…daughter. With Célestin gone to Tahiti, Marjorie (23 years old), who has been working in wood since she was small, took up the torch. She makes traditional sculptures See more – doorposts, masks, posts, guardian figures, as many pieces as are found in and around Ouvéa’s traditional huts – and also more abstract, modern and personalised pieces, such as portraits or pictures. Exposed by the side of the road at the entrance to Lékiny tribal village, her work encourages people to visit her workshop. On Ouvéa, as you wander around, you will meet other artists who, like Marjorie, sculpt gaïac, sandalwood or coconut palm wood. Hide
Saint-Joseph District
Saint Joseph Church
Saint Joseph covers Takedji, a tribe of Wallis Island origin, and Héo, whose inhabitants descend from populations who lived on the Beautemps-Beaupré atoll before the arrival of the missionaries. The Waleï Festival, See more which celebrates a variety of sweet yam, is organised in Héo each year. At the entrance to the village stands the Saint-Joseph church (1912), famous for its vaulted ceiling, its pulpit made of kohu and its Christ sculpted in black kaori and draped in a manou. This large church with its heavy doors also contains attractive renovated stained-glass windows. In front of it, opposite the bay, a stele was erected in 1957 in homage to the Reverend Fathers Bernard and Palasie, who founded a Catholic mission on 12 April 1857. Hide
Shark nursery
Shark nursery
Meet up in front of the Saint-Joseph church for an unusual walk of around three hours. The Hnimëk guided hike explores the far north of Ouvéa, the antechamber to the Pleaides islets. On the programme: a little talk on Kanak See more medicinal plants, a demonstration of fishing with a casting net, a trip through an area of dry forest, crossing a channel (be careful of the current) and a swim in the channel opposite Unyée islet. The key to the visit is in the mangrove swamp, where several species of shark come to reproduce: lemon sharks and blacktip or whitetip reef sharks. Approach the nursery, don’t make any noise and watch this unusual spectacle. Hide
Ouvéa parrots
Ouvéa parrots
Eunymphicus uvaeensis (Ouvéa parakeet) is a little green parrot, endemic to Ouvéa. It has a red mark on its forehead and its crest has six black feathers parting behind then curling forwards. It dwells mainly in the See more Saint-Joseph coconut groves, particularly in the Ognat forest, where it feeds on many seeds (it loves pawpaws!). Rallying the island inhabitants, custom authorities and scientists, the Association pour la sauvegarde de la perruche d’Ouvéa (ASPO) [Association for the protection of the Ouvéa parakeet] was established in 1993 to preserve this endangered species from extinction. To observe the parakeet, there is no need to go deep into the forest; it very often ventures right into the gardens. Hide
The  Pleiades islets
The Pleiades islets
Ouvéa atoll is closed to the west by a string of islets and sandbanks that stretch like comet tails hanging from the ends of the main island. These are the magical Pléiades islets. Trips to the Northern Pleaides leave from Saint Joseph. See more A marine excursion in a dream setting, heaven-sent encounters with slender manta rays and schools of cheeky dolphins, and a lunch break on one of the islets, some of which are called by the Polynesian word “motu” (Motu Niu, Motu Awa and so on). Trips to the Southern Pléiades islets leave from Mouli. You will fall for the charm of places that inspired several sequences in Luc Besson’s film, Le Grand Bleu. Hide
Scuba diving
Scuba diving
Ouvéa atoll and the Beautemps-Beaupré islands are part of the six areas of the New Caledonia lagoon registered in July 2008 as part of the World Heritage of humanity. Ouvéa’s inhabitants have always been aware of the See more incredible treasure their lagoon represented. This international recognition encourages them today to preserve it even more. A unique opportunity for all divers, amateur or experienced, to discover the many jewels of marine fauna and flora in a protected environment: green sea turtles, manta rays, humphead Maori wrasses, parrotfish, surgeonfish, sharks, and, on the external reef slopes, gorgonian coral, crinoids and other bouquets of alcyonarian coral. Hide
Searching within the site
To go straight to a search for accommodation or an activity on the Loyalty Islands, select an island and then click on accommodation or activities :



Through write-ups and images find out about the main festivals and events scheduled on Lifou, Maré and Ouvéa throughout the year.
Top of the page